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How to Create an Epic Treasure Hunt Your Kids Will Love!

A treasure hunt (or scavenger hunt) is a wonderful special idea to fill up an afternoon. This particular treasure hunt was for my charge Max to celebrate his 6th birthday - and needless to say he loved it! Max and his brother spent ages running round the house finding clues and working them out! At the end of the hunt, his prize was his birthday presents; giving the boys some lovely new toys to play with.

We even managed to make a display out of the materials used. I really recommend a treasure hunt as an exciting adventure for your kids or charges! A hunt like this can be prepared in just a few hours.

I would love for as many of you as possible to give this a try, so please do share it with people you think would enjoy it and let me know if you are successful in making your own scavenger hunt!

The theme for our treasure hunt was Harry Potter, Max’s favourite (it was his birthday after all!) I think the concept below would equally suit well for Ancient Egyptians or even for pirates, it’s just a matter of finding the right props.

For a scavenger hunt like this you will need:

  • Some paper and a printer (black and white will do)
  • 2 or 3 teabags
  • Some ribbon (mixed colour or same colour, up to you)
  • Some props suitable to your theme
  • Costumes to wear whilst doing the scavenger hunt (if possible!)
  • Some sort of prize!


Step one: Write your clues (and print them out)


This part takes a little creativity. I tried to make my clues rhyme, but that’s not totally necessary. I think it’s important to keep them a little bit cryptic but not too complicated - bear in mind that if your child doesn’t understand the clue it will take some of the excitement out of the scavenger hunt! I wrote a total of ten clues, which kept the boys busy for a good half hour. I typed out my clues using the Harry Potter type font here: flamingtext.com/logo/Design-Harry-Potter



Remember that the clues need to link together! I found that the easiest way was for each clue to direct the boys to a different part of the house. Where needed I also attached props to the clues (again, this isn’t totally necessary). The first clue should probably introduce your charge(s) to the treasure hunt, and the last one should be a congratulatory note to go with the prize.


The key is the shoes (a winged key in the shoe closet)

For the rest, each clue directed the boys to look for something specific in a room or place in order to find the next one. Where you hide the clues is totally up to your imagination - just make sure they’re in safe, reachable locations. I hid a clue next to a broom in a cleaning room and another close to ‘Moaning Myrtle’s toilet’ (make sure it’s clean!) It’s probably a good idea to write down the number of each clue and where you want to put it on a separate sheet of paper to keep track yourself and make sure all the clues fit together properly, as it can get a little confusing.

When you’ve prepared your clues, print them out on separate sheets of paper - I used an A4 sheet for each piece and then ripped them down to size.


Step two: Tea stain and dry your clues